The Kaya-Girl - a review

Updated: Nov 1, 2021

Eight-year-old avid bookworm Charys Kofigah gives us her thoughts on 'The Kaya-Girl' - a children's novel written by Mamle Wolo.


Charys loves reading

This award-winning book follows Abena and Faiza, two girls from different ethnic Ghanaian backgrounds that form a friendship after a chance meeting in Accra's Makola market.

Kaya-Girl
Cover image by the permission of Emmanuel Adiamah. Photographer Gerald Nartey

AKADi Magazine: What is the book about?

Charys Kofigah: The book is about two girls who meet as children, get separated and meet again as adults.


AM: Was the book engaging?

CK: Yes, it was. The vocabulary was very powerful and engaging. It made me want to read more.


AM: What did you learn about Ghana from the book?

CK: I was surprised to learn that some little girls, that should be in school, are having to carry heavy loads on their heads. I also learnt some new words in Ghanaian languages such as kayayoo meaning female porter. [Kaya comes from the Hausa word for load and Yoo meaning girl or woman in Ga/Adangme].


AM: If you had the chance, what question would you ask the author?

CK: One question I would ask her is: 'If you added one more character, what would their personality be like?'


AM: Out of 10, what would you rate the book at?

CK: I would give The Kaya-Girl 1,000 out of 10.

Mamle is a writer of Ghanaian and German heritage. Her book won the 2011 Burt Award for African Literature in Ghana. The book is published by Techmate Publishers and in 2018 by Nsona Books. It is distributed by Issac Books and Stationery.


You can read more about Mamle in our seventh issue of AKADi Magazine on identity, where she talks about her identity as a writer of mixed parentage. Click here to subscribe.

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